Quick Thoughts on the Golden Globes

The Golden Globe nominations are out, and with them comes good tidings for this year’s award season. Actually I’m pretty impressed/pleased-as-a-panda with the nominees this year. Although I haven’t really taken the Golden Globes very seriously before, they are pretty important, especially as it comes to generating good Oscar buzz.

The Golden Globes, given out by the Hollywood Foreign Press, aren’t often an indicator of quality as much as they are a glimpse into which movies have the most buzz about them, but this kind of lets them sneak some otherwise overlooked movies which, although they usually don’t win, gain a helping hand just by being nominated.

In 2009, they did this with The Hurt Locker. Although Avatar won the Globe, The Hurt Locker got a push from the nomination that led it to go on to win six Oscars, with Kathryn Bigelow becoming the first woman to win for Best Director. Say what you will about the wins, I think it was a good event.

Remember, all the awards are quite political in a sense, but none of the awards are for us audiences. They are for the filmmakers themselves and really we don’t have that much business in complaining about what wins and what doesn’t. Of course that doesn’t mean it isn’t toads loads of fun 😉

However, this year the Globes rounded off their nominee list with a pretty great selection of truly original movies. Let’s take a quick glance at them:

Best Motion Picture, Drama:

Boyhood
Foxcatcher
The Imitation Game
Selma
The Theory of Everything

Best Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy:

Into the Woods
Birdman
The Grand Budapest Hotel
St. Vincent
Pride

Best Director:

Ava DuVernay (Selma)
Wes Anderson (The Grand Budapest Hotel)
Alejandro González Iñárritu (Birdman)
David Fincher (Gone Girl)
Richard Linklater (Boyhood)

Best Screenplay:

Wes Anderson (The Grand Budapest Hotel)
Gillian Flynn (Gone Girl)
Alejandro González Iñárritu, Nicolás Giacobone, Alexander Dinelaris, Armando Bo (Birdman)
Richard Linklater (Boyhood)
Graham Moore (The Imitation Game)

Best Actor, Drama:

Eddie Redmayne (The Theory of Everything)
Steve Carell (Foxcatcher)
Benedict Cumberbatch (The Imitation Game)
David Oyelowo (Selma)
Jake Gyllenhaal (Nightcrawler)

Best Actress, Drama:

Julianne Moore (Still Alice)
Rosamund Pike (Gone Girl)
Reese Witherspoon (Wild)
Felicity Jones (The Theory of Everything)
Jennifer Anderson (Cake)

Best Actor, Musical or Comedy:

Michael Keaton (Birdman)
Bill Murray (St. Vincent)
Ralph Fiennes (The Grand Budapest Hotel)
Christoph Waltz (Big Eyes)
Joaquin Phoenix (Inherent Vice)

Best Actress, Musical or Comedy:

Julianne Moore (Maps to the Stars)
Amy Adams (Big Eyes)
Emily Blunt (Into the Woods)
Helen Mirren (The Hundred Foot Journey)
Quvenzhané Wallis (Annie)

Best Supporting Actor:

Ethan Hawke (Boyhood)
Robert Duvall (The Judge)
Edward Norton (Birdman)
J.K. Simmons (Whiplash)
Mark Ruffalo (Foxcatcher)

Best Supporting Actress:

Jessica Chastain (A Most Violent Year)
Keira Knightly (The Imitation Game)
Patricia Arquette (Boyhood)
Meryl Streep (Into the Woods)
Emma Stone (Birdman)

Note: I’m only going to talk about movies today as I haven’t been watching very much TV lately and don’t feel quite so qualified to discuss any of the nominees. It’s nothing against TV, it’s just how my schedule worked out this year.

You can find the rest of the nominees here

 

Overall, a pretty decent haul of nominees this year. There aren’t any movies here that I’m upset about. Right now, my money is on Boyhood quite a bit although that may change (my money, not my opinion) as the award date approaches and we hear more about which movies have buzz and things like that.

The awards are pretty predictable if you know what you’re looking for. Last year I guessed 20 of the Oscars simply by using statistics, and three of those guesses I could have gotten if I hadn’t changed my mind at the last second. I’m not saying that makes them less important or anything like that, I’m just pointing out that there is a bit of a system to awards season that does neglect deserving picks over still-good-but-not-quite picks. That’s the nature of things, I guess.

The important thing to remember, is that we need original movies. We need strikingly good movies, movies made with respect to the craft, movies that require a personal touch. We need stories that speak to us about our humanity, be that in a “positive” or a “negative” way. Whether we explore our dark sides, or indulge in a little fantastical romance, we need stories to help us make sense of our world. Life can get pretty meaningless if you’re not careful, and art is a way to combat the despairing reality of mortality. We need art. We need good art.

Edgar Wright said something on Twitter.

He couldn’t be more right. Original movies are the way forward indeed. I know movies need to make money, but originality is facing a lot of adversity lately, with franchises saturating the market. MARVEL has been doing some great things but honestly I’m tired of it. It’s just too much. I want to see something new. (Guardians of the Galaxy could be my favourite MARVEL movie though, so in no way am I saying they’ve done everything they could possibly do, who knows what they’ve got up their sleeves. By hiring people like James Gunn, who is a wonderfully authentic voice and definitely someone different from MARVEL’s usual lineup of trustworthy but somewhat blasé director choices, they’ve hit on something fascinating. Getting original filmmakers to reinterpret stories we all know and love could do fascinating things, although I’m still rather upset that Edgar Wright left Antman, as that was probably the boldest choice of all. Whatever, I’m over it.)

So all in all, I’m happy with the nominees this year. I’ll be posting a lot more once the Oscar list comes out, where I will go into more depth and really scrutinize the Academy’s choices because let’s be honest, that’s the best part.

 

Good luck to you all who are making movies, or trying to be original in the face of a system that makes authenticity difficult. We can certainly do it. Put it this way, if Richard Linklater can make a movie for 12 years, then we can do pretty much anything.

 

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5 comments

  1. Wonderful piece of writing here, Sam: “The important thing to remember, is that we need original movies. We need strikingly good movies, movies made with respect to the craft, movies that require a personal touch. We need stories that speak to us about our humanity, be that in a ‘positive’ or a ‘negative’ way. Whether we explore our dark sides, or indulge in a little fantastical romance, we need stories to help us make sense of our world. Life can get pretty meaningless if you’re not careful, and art is a way to combat the despairing reality of mortality. We need art. We need good art.” I couldn’t agree more.

    Although an interesting thought you may want to write about is the idea some day a movie like a ” Guardians of the Galaxy “or Captain America: The Winter Soldier” and actors such as Chris Pratt or Evans or Andy Serkis can and should be a part of the awards conversation.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks!
      I totally agree, maybe I’ll bring that up in an Oscar related post. We definitely need more recognition for sci-fi and genre films, and people like Serkis who do “invisible” work. ScarJo not getting any recognition for HER was upsetting, and for that matter, there should have been more discussion for Samantha Morton doing the preliminary voice work. It’s been 80+ years, the Academy should try something different.

      Liked by 1 person

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